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Mike Nonaka

Michael Nonaka is co-chair of the Financial Services Group and advises banks, financial services providers, fintech companies, and commercial companies on a broad range of compliance, enforcement, transactional, and legislative matters.

He specializes in providing advice relating to federal and state licensing and applications matters for banks and other financial institutions, the development of partnerships and platforms to provide innovative financial products and services, and a broad range of compliance areas such as anti-money laundering, financial privacy, cybersecurity, and consumer protection. He also works closely with banks and their directors and senior leadership teams on sensitive supervisory and strategic matters.

Mike plays an active role in the firm’s Fintech Initiative and works with a number of banks, lending companies, money transmitters, payments firms, technology companies, and service providers on innovative technologies such as bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, blockchain, big data, cloud computing, same day payments, and online lending. He has assisted numerous banks and fintech companies with the launch of innovative deposit and loan products, technology services, and cryptocurrency-related products and services.

Mike has advised a number of clients on compliance with TILA, ECOA, TISA, HMDA, FCRA, EFTA, GLBA, FDCPA, CRA, BSA, USA PATRIOT Act, FTC Act, Reg. K, Reg. O, Reg. W, Reg. Y, state money transmitter laws, state licensed lender laws, state unclaimed property laws, state prepaid access laws, and other federal and state laws and regulations.

On January 22, 2013, the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council proposed guidance on the applicability of consumer protection and compliance laws, regulations, and policies to activities conducted via social media by depository institutions.  The proposed guidance would not impose additional compliance obligations on institutions.  Instead, the guidance is intended to help financial institutions understand potential consumer compliance, legal, reputation, and operational risks associated with the use of social media, along with expectations for managing those risks. 

The proposed guidance defines “social media” as “a form of interactive online communication in which users can generate and share content through text, images, audio, and/or video.”  The FFIEC warns that social media can impact a depository institution’s risk profile by increasing the risk of harm to consumers, compliance and legal risk, operational risk, and reputational risk. 

Continue Reading FFIEC Proposes Social Media Guidance

In its most recent issue of the Supervisory Insights newsletter, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) describes mobile payment technologies, the risks they pose to depository institutions, and the regulatory framework applicable to such technologies.  The FDIC notes the widespread use of smartphones as a payment technology and the increasing availability of point-of-sale terminals equipped to process payments using near-field communications.  Both of these factors require institutions to understand and adopt controls to mitigate risk from mobile payment technologies.Continue Reading FDIC Highlights Mobile Payment Technologies and Related Risks

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission entered into a consent order with two companies alleged to have operated as consumer reporting agencies, by providing criminal record reports through mobile applications, without complying with the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).  The consent order represents the FTC’s first FCRA case involving mobile applications. 

According to the FTC’s 

Last week, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced that it had established a process for assisting consumers with credit reporting complaints.  The CFPB previously had implemented similar processes for complaints relating to credit cards, mortgages, bank accounts and services, private student loans, vehicle, and other consumer loans.  The complaint process is intended to complement

On October 26, 2012, the FTC finalized settlements with Georgia auto dealer Franklin Budget Car Sales, Inc. and Utah-based debt collector EPN Inc. over charges that each company illegally exposed sensitive personal information of consumers by allowing peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing software to be installed on their corporate computer systems.  The final settlements follow a notice-and-comment period opened to the public in June 2012.Continue Reading FTC Finalizes Settlements with Companies for Exposing Sensitive Consumer Information through Installation of Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Software

By Lindsey Tonsager and Mike Nonaka

On October 2, 2012, the Federal Trade Commission filed a proposed consent decree resolving claims that Artist Arena LLC violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by collecting and disclosing email addresses, birth dates and other personal information from more than 100,000 children younger than the age of

Last week, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released a study comparing credit scores sold to creditors and those sold to consumers.  The study found that approximately 1 in 5 consumers would, upon purchasing their credit score from a consumer reporting agency, receive a different credit score than the score provided to creditors for use

The Federal Trade Commission has released a guide, Marketing Your Mobile App: Get It Right from the Start, to help mobile application developers comply with truth-in-advertising standards and privacy principles.  Although the guide is informal and not binding guidance, it does represent helpful FTC commentary.  The guide notes that a one-size fits all approach is not workable

In an interview with Information Security Media Group, William Henley, Associate Director of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s (FDIC) Technology Supervision Branch, discussed the status of the banking industry’s implementation of FFIEC authentication guidance released in July 2011.  Henley generally said that the industry was working towards compliance and offered that FDIC examiners at this

On August 1, Illinois became the second state in the country to prohibit employers from requesting or requiring employees to provide their passwords for social networking accounts.  As reported in this blog, Maryland adopted similar legislation in April.  The bill (HB 3782) was signed into law by Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and will become