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Mark Young advises clients on data protection, cybersecurity and other tech regulatory matters. He has particular expertise in product counselling, GDPR regulatory investigations, and legislative advocacy. Mr. Young leads on EU cybersecurity regulatory matters, and helps to oversee our internet enforcement team.

He has been recognized in Chambers UK as "a trusted adviser - practical, results-oriented and an expert in the field." Recent editions note that he is "deeply knowledgeable in the area of privacy and data protection," "fast, thorough and responsive," and has "great insight into the regulators."

Mr. Young has over 15 years of experience advising global companies, particularly in the technology, health and pharmaceutical sectors, on all aspects of data protection and security. This includes providing practical guidance on analyzing and using personal data, transferring personal data across borders, and potential liability exposure. He specializes in advising in relation to new products and services, and providing strategic advice and advocacy on a range of EU law reform issues and references to the EU Court of Justice.

For cybersecurity matters, he counsels clients on practices to protect business-critical information and comply with national and sector-specific regulation, and on preparing for and responding to cyber-based attacks and internal threats to their networks and information. He has helped a range of organizations respond to cyber and data security incidents – including external data breaches and insider theft of trade secrets – through the stages of initial detection, containment, notification, recovery and remediation.

In the IP enforcement space, Mr. Young represents right owners in the sport, media, publishing, fashion and luxury goods industries, and helps coordinate a team of internet investigators that has nearly two decades of experience conducting global notice and takedown programs to combat internet piracy.

On 1 April 2020, the UK Supreme Court handed down its ruling in WM Morrison Supermarkets plc v Various Claimants [2020] UKSC 12.  The Court ruled that Morrisons was not vicariously liable for a data breach deliberately perpetrated by an employee.  The judgment is significant in that it overturned the decisions of the two lower courts (the High Court and Court of Appeal) and provides guidance for employers on when they may be held vicariously liable for data breaches and other violations of the GDPR involving employees, who act as independent controllers in their own right.

Continue Reading UK Supreme Court Rules That Supermarket Is Not Vicariously Liable For Data Breach Committed By Employee

The UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) has issued and is consulting on draft guidance about explaining decisions made by AI.  The ICO prepared the guidance with The Alan Turing Institute, which is the UK’s national institute for data science and artificial intelligence.  Among other things, the guidance sets out key principles to follow and steps to take when explaining AI-assisted decisions — including in relation to different types of AI algorithms — and the policies and procedures that organizations should consider putting in place.

The draft guidance builds upon the ICO’s previous work in this area, including its AI Auditing Framework, June 2019 Project ExplAIN interim report, and September 2017 paper ‘Big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning and data protection’.  (Previous blog posts that track this issue are available here.)  Elements of the new draft guidance touch on points that go beyond narrow GDPR requirements, such as AI ethics (see, in particular, the recommendation to provide explanations of the fairness or societal impacts of AI systems).  Other sections of the guidance are quite technical; for example, the ICO provides its own analysis of the possible uses and interpretability of eleven specific types of AI algorithms.

Organizations that develop, test or deploy AI decision-making systems should review the draft guidance and consider responding to the consultation. The consultation is open until January 24, 2020.  A final version is expected to be published later next year.


Continue Reading UK ICO and The Alan Turing Institute Issue Draft Guidance on Explaining Decisions Made by AI

On July 25, 2019, the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) published a blog on the trade-offs between different data protection principles when using Artificial Intelligence (“AI”).  The ICO recognizes that AI systems must comply with several data protection principles and requirements, which at times may pull organizations in different directions.  The blog identifies notable trade-offs that may arise, provides some practical tips for resolving these trade-offs, and offers worked examples on visualizing and mathematically minimizing trade-offs.

The ICO invites organizations with experience of considering these complex issues to provide their views.  This recent blog post on trade-offs is part of its on-going Call for Input on developing a new framework for auditing AI.  See also our earlier blog on the ICO’s call for input on bias and discrimination in AI systems here.


Continue Reading ICO publishes blog post on AI and trade-offs between data protection principles

Back in 2013, we published a blog post entitled, “European Regulators and the Eternal Cookie Debate” about what constitutes “consent” for purposes of complying with the EU’s cookie rules.  The debate continues…  Yesterday, the ICO published new guidance on the use of cookies and a related “myth-busting” blog post.  Some of the

On June 20, 2019, Keith Krach was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become the Trump administration’s first permanent Privacy Shield Ombudsperson at the State Department.  The role of the Privacy Shield Ombudsperson is to act as an additional redress avenue for all EU data subjects whose data is transferred from the EU or Switzerland

On 30 May 2019, the United Kingdom’s ICO released a report, “GDPR: One Year On”, discussing the impact of the GDPR and its associated learnings after one year following its implementation (the “Report”), which provides valuable insight into the enforcement practices, EU-wide cooperation, support functions, innovative practices and further growth plans of the ICO. The contents of the Report will likely prove useful in helping to map out the direction the ICO will take during the course of the coming year and beyond.

Continue Reading ICO Publishes Report on Impact of GDPR

On June 3, 2019, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”), released an Interim Report on a collaboration project with The Alan Turing Institute (“Institute”) called “Project ExplAIn.” The purpose of this project, according to the ICO, is to develop “practical guidance” for organizations on complying with UK data protection law when using artificial intelligence (“AI”) decision-making systems; in particular, to explain the impact AI decisions may have on individuals. This Interim Report may be of particular relevance to organizations considering how to meet transparency obligations when deploying AI systems that make automated decisions that fall within the scope of Article 22 of the GDPR.

Continue Reading ICO’s Interim Report on Explaining AI

Earlier this month, the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office published a draft code of practice (“Code”) on designing online services for children. The Code  is now open for public consultation until May 31, 2019. The Code sets out 16 standards of “age appropriate design” with which online service providers should comply when designing online services (such as apps, connected toys, social media platforms, online games, educational websites and streaming services) that children under the age of 18 are likely to access. The standards are based on data protection law principles, and are legally enforceable under the GDPR and UK Data Protection Act 2018. The Code also provides further guidance on collecting consent from children and the legal basis for processing children’s personal data (see Annex A and B of the Code). The Code should be read in conjunction with the ICO’s current guidance on children and the GDPR.
Continue Reading ICO issues draft code of practice on designing online services for children

The European Commission (“Commission”) has published a Recommendation on cybersecurity in the energy sector (“Recommendation”).  The Recommendation builds on recent EU legislation in this area, including the NIS Directive and EU Cybersecurity Act (see our posts here and here).  It sets out guidance to achieve a higher level of cybersecurity taking into account specific characteristics of the energy sector, including the use of legacy technology and interdependent systems across borders.

Continue Reading EU Commission Issues Recommendation on Cybersecurity in the Energy Sector

Two sets of regulations aimed at readying UK data protection law for a post-Brexit world have been promulgated in recent weeks.  These regulations, which were made pursuant to the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (EUWA), will only come into force in most respects upon the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.  Broadly speaking, these regulations are intended to preserve the status quo post-Brexit by (1) amending certain provisions of the GDPR to allow it to be retained as UK domestic law and (2) transitionally adopting certain key decisions of the EU institutions that, collectively, would allow for the continued lawfulness of personal data flows out of the United Kingdom where currently permitted under EU law.  In both regards, these regulations are consistent with prior guidance from the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (discussed here).
Continue Reading UK Issues Regulations on Post-Brexit Data Protection Law