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Ulrike Elteste is an experienced technology, media and intellectual property lawyer in the firm’s Frankfurt office. She also advises on related regulatory aspects, in particular, privacy law, financial services supervisory law, and telecommunications law. She is regularly involved in cross-border transactions with a focus on technology or IP. Ulrike also represents clients in commercial and IP litigation.

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On December 2, 2019, the German Supervisory Authorities issued a report evaluating the implementation of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) in Germany.  The report describes the Supervisory Authorities’ experience thus far in applying the GDPR and lists the provisions of the GDPR they see as problematic in practice.  For each of these provisions, the report discusses the perceived problem and proposes a solution.

The report begins by noting that the GDPR has significantly increased the workload of German Supervisory Authorities over the past year and a half.  This is due not only to an “enormous growth” in the number of complaints and consultation requests received, but also additional work resulting from the GDPR’s cross-border cooperation procedure.  Since the increased workload has not always been met with increased resources, the authorities have found it difficult to effectively supervise compliance.  Controllers are apparently aware of this and, as a result, have neglected their duties to be GDPR compliant.

Continue Reading German Supervisory Authorities Propose Changes to the GDPR

In two recent landmark decisions issued on November 6, 2019, the German Constitutional Court (“BVerfG”) presented its unique perspective on the “right to be forgotten” and announced that it will assume a greater role in safeguarding German residents’ fundamental rights from now on.

Continue Reading German Constitutional Court Reshapes “Right to be Forgotten” and Expands Its Oversight of Human Rights Violations

On October 30, 2019, the supervisory authority (“SA”) of Berlin issued a € 14.5 million fine against the real estate company Deutsche Wohnen SE for storing personal data of tenants without a legal basis (Art. 6 GDPR) and for not implementing the GDPR principle of privacy by design (Art. 5 and 25(1) GDPR) (press release

On October 16, 2019, the body of German Supervisory Authorities known as the Datenschutzkonferenz (“DSK”) released a document proposing a model for calculating fines under the GDPR.  The DSK indicated that this model is subject to change and will be superseded by any method put forward in guidance issued by the European Data Protection Board.

Update, September 19, 2019: Further to the reports on its scheme for calculating fines, which prompted requests on the supervisory to publish it, the Datenschutzkonferenz has clarified that fines in individual cases are calculated on the basis of Art. 83(2) GDPR, and that the model is only used on a complimentary basis. Furthermore, the

Guidance on how to identify data subjects

On July 1, 2019, the Bavarian Supervisory Authority for the public sector (“SA”) published guidance on how to verify the identity of data subjects exercising their data protection rights under the GDPR. The guidance is directed at public bodies, but is also helpful for private entities.

According to

The Supervisory Authority of Baden-Württemberg (“SA”), Germany, has published a new version of its guidance document on data protection issues in the employment context on March 12, 2019 (available here in German).

The guidance document specifically addresses issues such as the use of e-mail and IT systems by employees, urine drug tests, personal data collected