Several states have proposed new privacy bills since their sessions began.  Some of the proposed bills carry over or re-introduce bills drafted in previous legislative sessions, while others are introducing firstin-time omnibus privacy bills.  In the high-level chart below, we compare five of the key state privacy frameworks: the CPRA, VCDPA (which we blogged about here), the NYPA, the general privacy provisions of the Washington Privacy Act, and the newly introduced Washington People’s Privacy Act (HB 1433)

 

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Photo of Libbie Canter Libbie Canter

Libbie Canter is a member of the Communications & Media, Data Privacy and Cybersecurity, and Litigation Practice Groups. She represents and advises clients on matters before Congress and various federal agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.  She has…

Libbie Canter is a member of the Communications & Media, Data Privacy and Cybersecurity, and Litigation Practice Groups. She represents and advises clients on matters before Congress and various federal agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission.  She has advised clients on a broad range of privacy issues, including data security breach matters, online and mobile marketing, and social networking policies for employers.  Her legislative work focuses on the areas of communications and media, privacy law, and cloud computing policy.

Photo of Lindsey Tonsager Lindsey Tonsager

Lindsey Tonsager helps national and multinational clients in a broad range of industries anticipate and effectively evaluate legal and reputational risks under federal and state data privacy and communications laws.

In addition to assisting clients engage strategically with the Federal Trade Commission, the…

Lindsey Tonsager helps national and multinational clients in a broad range of industries anticipate and effectively evaluate legal and reputational risks under federal and state data privacy and communications laws.

In addition to assisting clients engage strategically with the Federal Trade Commission, the U.S. Congress, and other federal and state regulators on a proactive basis, she has experience helping clients respond to informal investigations and enforcement actions, including by self-regulatory bodies such as the Digital Advertising Alliance and Children’s Advertising Review Unit.

Ms. Tonsager’s practice focuses on helping clients launch new products and services that implicate the laws governing the use of endorsements and testimonials in advertising and social media, the collection of personal information from children and students online, behavioral advertising, e-mail marketing, artificial intelligence the processing of “big data” in the Internet of Things, spectrum policy, online accessibility, compulsory copyright licensing, telecommunications and new technologies.

Ms. Tonsager also conducts privacy and data security diligence in complex corporate transactions and negotiates agreements with third-party service providers to ensure that robust protections are in place to avoid unauthorized access, use, or disclosure of customer data and other types of confidential information. She regularly assists clients in developing clear privacy disclosures and policies―including website and mobile app disclosures, terms of use, and internal social media and privacy-by-design programs.

Photo of Jayne Ponder Jayne Ponder

Jayne Ponder is an associate in the firm’s Washington, DC office and a member of the Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice Group.

Ms. Ponder is admitted to the Bar of Massachusetts. District of Columbia bar application pending; supervised by principles of the firm.