BNA is reporting that Mexico’s data protection authority, the Federal Institute for Access to Information and Data Protection (IFAI), will issue a fine of $1 million against one of Mexico’s largest banks for violating the country’s Federal Law on the Protection of Personal Data in Possession of Private Parties.  The action against the bank &mdash

The convening of the 34th International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners in Punta del Este, Uruguay on Oct. 22-26 — on the heels of last year’s conference in Mexico City — underscores the importance of the Latin American region in the global debate around data privacy regulation.

From 2000 to 2008, only Argentina and Uruguay created comprehensive data privacy regimes.  Yet in just a two-year span from 2010 to 2012, another five countries — Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru, and most recently Nicaragua — have adopted comprehensive data privacy laws of their own.  Implementing regulations already have gone into effect in Mexico and are expected to come into force in Costa Rica and Peru shortly.  The Colombian law awaits a Presidential decree and implementing regulations.   

More laws and regulations are sure to follow.  Just within the past year, governments in Brazil, Chile, and Ecuador have publicly considered adoption of new data privacy laws.  

Continue Reading On the Eve of International Conference in Uruguay, Taking Stock of Data Privacy Developments in Latin America

Mexican legislators are currently preparing implementing regulations to formally bring into force the Mexican federal privacy statute by July this year.  Some provisions of the new law, such as provisions relating to data access rights, are expected to come into force by January 2012.  Reports are that Mexico is also aiming to secure a formal declaration of adequacy from the European