Tag Archives: Netflix

Senate Passes VPPA Amendment; Bill Heads to President Obama

Last night, the Senate passed an amendment to the Video Privacy Protection Act, 18 U.S.C. § 2710, designed to make it easier for users to share their online video viewing activities.   (We’ve discussed the amendment’s content here and here.)  President Obama is expected to sign the bill into law.  Netflix, the most prominent backer of … Continue Reading

Court Dismisses VPPA Suit Against Netflix

The past few years have witnessed a series of attempts by plaintiffs to apply the Video Privacy Protection Act (“VPPA”) — a statute passed in 1988 to protect against certain disclosures of video rental records — to the video distribution technologies of today.  For example, in Sterk v. Redbox Automated Retail, plaintiffs sued the video … Continue Reading

Netflix to Settle Video Privacy Suit

According to court documents filed last week, Netflix has agreed to change its data storage practices and pay about $9 million to settle allegations that it unlawfully retained and disclosed customers’ video-viewing histories.  Specifically, Netflix agreed to decouple viewing history from identification information once users have been inactive for a year; to pay $30,000 to … Continue Reading

Senate Privacy Subcommittee Schedules Video Privacy Hearing

As we previously reported, the Video Privacy Protection Act reform bill sponsored by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) passed the House.  And now the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law has scheduled a hearing on video privacy, to be held next Tuesday, January 31. The VPPA has come under scrutiny in recent … Continue Reading

Netflix, Redbox Sued for Allegedly Violating Renters’ Privacy

Two of the country’s largest video rental services, Netflix and Redbox, have been sued for allegedly violating the federal Video Privacy Protection Act (“VPPA”).  The plaintiffs in both suits contend that the rental services stored information about their rental histories for long after that information had ceased being “necessary” to provide the services for which … Continue Reading
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