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Lindsay Brewer is an associate in the firm's Washington office. She advises clients on environmental, product safety, occupational safety, and public policy issues. She has experience with a wide range of environmental and safety programs, with a focus on the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA/Superfund), the Federal Trade Commission Act (FTC Act), the Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA), the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS), and the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act).

Introduction

In this update, we detail the key legislative developments in the second quarter of 2021 related to artificial intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), connected and automated vehicles (“CAVs”), and federal privacy legislation.  As we recently covered on May 12,  President Biden signed an Executive Order to strengthen the federal government’s ability to respond to and prevent cybersecurity threats, including by removing obstacles to sharing threat information between private sector entities and federal agencies and modernizing federal systems.  On the hill, lawmakers have introduced a number of proposals to regulate AI, IoT, CAVs, and privacy.
Continue Reading U.S. AI, IoT, CAV, and Privacy Legislative Update – Second Quarter 2021

On April 30, 2019, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published in the Federal Register a notification of enforcement discretion indicating that it will lower the annual Civil Money Penalty (CMP) limits for three of the four penalty tiers in the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH Act).  The HITECH Act categorizes violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) in four tiers based on the violators’ level of culpability for the violation: the person did not know (and, by exercising reasonable diligence, would not have known) that the person violated the provision (Tier 1); the violation was due to reasonable cause, and not willful neglect (Tier 2); the violation was due to willful neglect that is timely corrected (Tier 3); and the violation was due to willful neglect that is not timely corrected (Tier 4).

The maximum penalty per violation for all four tiers was previously $1.5 million.  HHS’s new policy states that the annual penalty limit for Tier 1 violations has now been decreased from $1.5 million to $25,000.  The new annual penalty limits for Tier 2 and 3 violations are now $100,000 and $250,000, respectively.  The penalty limit for Tier 4 violations will remain at $1.5 million.
Continue Reading HHS Updates Maximum Annual Penalty Limits for Some HIPAA Violations

On Friday, April 19, 2019, the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) explained in an FAQ the circumstances under which electronic health record (EHR) systems may be subject to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) liability for an app’s impermissible use or disclosure

Earlier this year, the FTC’s staff released a series of blog posts entitled Stick with Security that updated and expanded upon the prior Start with Security best-practices guide for information security practices.  The Stick with Security series draws from FTC complaints, consent orders, closed investigations, and input from companies around the country to provide deeper insights into the ten principles articulated in the Start with Security guide.  These guidelines serve as a set of minimum recommended standards for “reasonable” data security practices by organizations with access to personal data (i.e. information related to consumers and employees), although they can be applied to other types of data as well.  The recommendations are not legal requirements, of course, but it can be useful for companies to consider the views of the FTC’s staff on the practices that are likely to be seen by the FTC as “reasonable.”  This post summarizes the recommendations made by the FTC’s staff in the Stick with Security series.
Continue Reading Key Information Security Pointers from the FTC’s Stick with Security Guidance