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Michael Nonaka is a partner in the firm’s Financial Institutions practice group. He represents banks and other financial institutions on a wide variety of bank regulatory, enforcement, legislative and policy issues.  Mr. Nonaka also is co-chair of the firm’s Fintech Initiative and works with a number of banks, lending companies, money transmitters, payments firms, technology companies, and service providers on innovative technologies such as big data, blockchain and related technologies, bitcoin and other virtual currencies, same day payments, and online lending.

Today, the Federal Trade Commission released the agenda and panelists for the public forum it is holding on mobile security, Mobile Security: Potential Threats and Solutions, on June 4, 2013.  The forum will bring together technology researchers, industry members, and academics to explore mobile malware, the security of existing and developing mobile technologies, and

Earlier this month, Maneesha Mithal, Associate Director of the Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Privacy and Identity Protection, testified before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance regarding consumer report accuracy and the FTC’s efforts to improve accuracy through education and enforcement.  Her testimony emphasized the impact that consumer report errors

Last week, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) published in the Federal Register a joint rule requiring entities regulated by the agencies to adopt programs to detect and prevent identity theft.  The rule is referred to as the “red flags rule” and applies to certain broker-dealers, mutual funds, investment advisers, futures

On March 27, 2013, the Federal Reserve released a report on consumers’ use of mobile banking and mobile payments.  The report follows a similar report issued by the Federal Reserve last year.  The report found that use of mobile banking has increased significantly in the past year while use of mobile payments has increased as well. 

As of November 2012, 28 percent of all mobile phone users (compared to 21 percent in December 2011) and 48 percent of smartphone users (compared to 42 percent in December 2011) had used mobile banking in the past 12 months.  The recent report found that 15 percent of all smartphone users have made a payment from their phone in the past 12 months, compared to 12 percent of users from the prior report.  In addition, the use of mobile phones to deposit checks has doubled in the past year, rising from approximately 10 percent to 21 percent.      

The most common uses of mobile banking are to check account balances or recent transactions (87 percent of users) and to transfer money between accounts (53 percent of users).  The most common use of mobile payments is to make online bill payments (42 percent of users).  Six percent of all smartphone users have made a point-of-sale payment using their phone in the past 12 months, which represents a sizable increase from the one percent of users in December 2011. 


Continue Reading Federal Reserve Releases Report of Mobile Banking and Mobile Payments Use

Earlier this week, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 749, the Eliminate Privacy Notice Confusion Act.  The bill is sponsored by Rep. Blaine Leutkemeyer (R-MO) and Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA).  An earlier version of the bill passed the House in December but was never taken up by the Senate.  We previously covered similar legislation

Last Friday, the Federal Trade Commission released a report, Paper, Plastic…or Mobile?, on the use of mobile payments.  The report follows a workshop hosted by the FTC in April 2012 that explored innovative mobile payment products and services, the potential benefits offered by mobile payments, and the concerns they raise.  For purposes of the report, mobile payments generally include four types of payment processes:  (1) near field communication (NFC) technologies, (2) mobile applications, (3) online checkout wallets, and (4) mobile carrier billing (charging of payments directly to a mobile phone bill).

The report focuses on the primary areas where the increasing use of mobile payments raises concerns, including dispute resolution, data security, and privacy.  The report also highlights special concerns regarding mobile carrier billing and international mobile payments.


Continue Reading FTC Issues Report on Mobile Payments

This week, the Federal Trade Commission released a study of the U.S. credit reporting industry and credit report accuracy.  The study found that five percent of consumers had errors on one of their three nationwide credit reports that could lead them to pay more for financial products.  The study is required under section 319 of

On February 7, 2013, the Payment Card Industry (PCI) council released a supplement to the payment card industry data security standards (PCI-DSS) on the use of cloud technologies and considerations for maintaining PCI DSS controls in cloud environments.  The supplement is intended for merchants, service providers, assessors, and other entities in evaluating the use of

On January 22, 2013, the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council proposed guidance on the applicability of consumer protection and compliance laws, regulations, and policies to activities conducted via social media by depository institutions.  The proposed guidance would not impose additional compliance obligations on institutions.  Instead, the guidance is intended to help financial institutions understand potential consumer compliance, legal, reputation, and operational risks associated with the use of social media, along with expectations for managing those risks. 

The proposed guidance defines “social media” as “a form of interactive online communication in which users can generate and share content through text, images, audio, and/or video.”  The FFIEC warns that social media can impact a depository institution’s risk profile by increasing the risk of harm to consumers, compliance and legal risk, operational risk, and reputational risk. 


Continue Reading FFIEC Proposes Social Media Guidance

In its most recent issue of the Supervisory Insights newsletter, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) describes mobile payment technologies, the risks they pose to depository institutions, and the regulatory framework applicable to such technologies.  The FDIC notes the widespread use of smartphones as a payment technology and the increasing availability of point-of-sale terminals equipped to process payments using near-field communications.  Both of these factors require institutions to understand and adopt controls to mitigate risk from mobile payment technologies.


Continue Reading FDIC Highlights Mobile Payment Technologies and Related Risks