BIPA

An Illinois federal district court recently rejected dismissal of Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”) claims in In re Clearview AI, Inc., Consumer Privacy Litigation, No. 21-cv-135 (N.D. Ill.).  The Clearview plaintiffs alleged that Clearview violated their privacy rights without their knowledge and consent by scraping more than three billion photographs of facial images from the internet and using artificial intelligence algorithms on the images to harvest individuals’ unique facial biometric identifiers and corresponding biometric information.  Clearview sought dismissal of the BIPA claims under the First Amendment, extraterritoriality doctrine, dormant commerce clause, and BIPA’s express exemption for  photographs.  The court rejected these grounds, and declined to dismiss the BIPA claims.
Continue Reading Court Rejects Dismissal of Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act Against Clearview AI in Pending Multidistrict Litigation

2021 was another busy year for data privacy regulatory enforcement and litigation. With some distance to reflect on last year, we have prepared this post identifying and describing important trends from 2021 that can help provide insight into what to expect in the data privacy landscape in 2022.

Data Privacy Regulatory Enforcement Trends

Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and state enforcement action in 2021 centered on several key areas, including protecting children.

An FTC enforcement action last year alleged that the maker of an online coloring book application violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by collecting personal information about children who used the app without notifying their parents and obtaining their consent.  The allegations note that the app included a “Kids” category that was targeted to children.  The FTC further claimed that the app’s social media features collected personal information from users and that some parents, lacking knowledge of these features, may have inadvertently permitted their young children to use the app.
Continue Reading 2021 Trends in Privacy Regulatory Enforcement and Litigation

Senators Jeff Merkley (D-Merkley) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) recently introduced the National Biometric Information Privacy Act (NBIPA), which would require private entities to obtain consumers’ and employees’ written consent prior to collecting their biometric information and expand nationwide individuals’ access rights and rights to request additional information from businesses.  The bill also would grant a private right of action.  Unlike other proposals that focus on regulating the use and funding of biometric surveillance technology by government entities, the NBIPA regulates private entities’ use of biometrics.
Continue Reading Bill Restricting Companies’ Use of Biometrics and Expanding California’s Right To Know Nationwide Introduced in Senate

On May 5, 2020, the Seventh Circuit held that violations of the section 15(b) disclosure and informed consent provisions of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14/1 et seq. (“BIPA”) constitute “an invasion of personal rights that is both concrete and particularized” for the purposes of establishing Article III standing to sue in federal courts.  However, the Seventh Circuit also held that the alleged harms associated with violations of section 15(a) of BIPA were insufficient to establish Article III standing.  Section 15(a) mandates public disclosure of a retention schedule and guidelines for permanent destruction of collected biometric information.

Covington has previously discussed developments in BIPA litigation, which has proliferated in recent years with the advancement of relevant technologies.  The increase in BIPA litigation has been accompanied by a rise in disputes over the nature of the harm required to sustain an action, both in state and federal courts.  Although this issue was seemingly resolved at the state-level by the Illinois Supreme Court’s 2019 Rosenbach decision, federal courts have continued to grapple with the issue for the purposes of Article III standing.
Continue Reading Seventh Circuit Rules on Article III Standing Issues in Illinois BIPA Lawsuit, Allowing Case to Proceed in Federal Court

The regular session of the Florida Legislature began on March 5, 2019. Over the course of the 60 day session, the Legislature will consider a number of bills on a variety of topics. Among the measures that will be considered are two bills that address biometric information privacy: one from House Representative Bobby DuBose (D) (HB1153) and one from Senator Gary Farmer, Jr. (D) (SB 1270).
Continue Reading Florida Legislature Proposes State Biometric Information Privacy Act

On January 25, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court published its widely anticipated decision in Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corporation et al., addressing the question of what it means to be an “aggrieved” person under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14/1 et seq. (“BIPA”). Under BIPA, aggrieved persons are entitled to seek liquidated damages and injunctive relief. In a unanimous decision authored by Chief Judge Karmeier, the court held that individuals seeking relief under BIPA “need not allege some actual injury or adverse effect” to be considered aggrieved persons.
Continue Reading Illinois Supreme Court Decides Actual Harm Not Required to Bring Claim Under BIPA

On November 20, 2018, the Illinois Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corporation et al., a case arising under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14/1 et seq. (“BIPA”).  BIPA provides a private right of action for persons “aggrieved by a violation of [the] Act.”  The crux of the issue presented to the Illinois Supreme Court is the meaning of “aggrieved by” under BIPA–in other words, what harm is sufficient to satisfy statutory standing requirements underlying BIPA’s private right of action?
Continue Reading Illinois Supreme Court to Decide Statutory Standing Requirements Under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act