Children's Privacy

On Monday, March 25, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed SB 3 into law. At a high level, the bill requires social media platforms to terminate the accounts of individuals under the age of 14, while seeking parental consent for accounts of those 14 or 15 years of age. The law will become effective January 1, 2025. Continue Reading Florida Enacts Social Media Bill Restricting Access for Teens Under the Age of Sixteen

On May 22 the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced a $6 million settlement with Edmodo, an ed tech provider, for violations of the COPPA Rule and Section 5 of the FTC Act.  The FTC described this settlement as the first FTC order that will prohibit an ed tech provider from requiring students to provide more personal data than necessary to participate in online activities.  The settlement is consistent with the FTC’s policy statement on ed tech issued last May (see our summary of the policy statement here).Continue Reading FTC Announces COPPA Settlement Against Ed Tech Provider Including Strict Data Minimization and Data Retention Requirements

The UK Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) recently published detailed draft guidance on what “likely to be accessed” by children means in the context of its Age-Appropriate Design Code (“Code”), which came into force on September 2, 2020. The Code applies to online services “likely to be accessed by children” in the UK. “Children” are individuals under the age of 18. In order to determine whether an online service is “likely to be accessed” by children, companies must assess whether the nature and content of the service has “particular appeal for children” and “the way in which the service was accessed”. This new draft guidance provides further assistance on how to make this assessment, and is undergoing a public consultation until May 19, 2023.Continue Reading UK ICO Provides Guidance On When A Service Is “Likely To Be Accessed By Children” And Needs To Comply With Its Age-Appropriate Design Code

This year has been off to a busy start with respect to children’s and minors’ privacy legislation efforts. We wanted to take a moment to recap the latest developments across the board.

The most notable trend of the year thus far has been the widespread introduction of Age Appropriate Design Codes. Ten states have thus

Regulators in Europe and beyond have been ramping up their efforts related to online safety for minors, through new legislation, guidance, and by promoting self-regulatory tools.  We discuss below recent developments in the EU and UK on age verification online.Continue Reading Age Verification: State of Play and Key Developments in the EU and UK

On Tuesday, February 14, 2023, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing titled “Protecting Our Children Online.”  The witnesses included only consumer advocates, and no industry representatives.  As Committee Chair, however, Senator Durbin (D-IL) indicated that he plans to hold another hearing featuring representatives from technology companies.Continue Reading Senate Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing on Children’s Online Safety

On February 16, 2023, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) released guidance for the video game industry on how to conform with the UK’s Age Appropriate Design Code when developing video games. This blog post summarizes the ICO’s recommendations for video game developers and designers when creating video games that are likely to be accessed by children under the age of 18. For more information about the UK’s Age Appropriate Design Code, see our previous blog posts here and here.Continue Reading UK Information Commissioner’s Office Publishes Guidance for Video Game Developers and Designers to Improve Data Protection in their Services

The Ninth Circuit recently held that the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, which gives the Federal Trade Commission  authority to regulate the online collection of personal information from children under the age of 13, does not preempt consistent state law, potentially increasing the risk of class action litigation based on alleged COPPA violations.  See Jones

Last week, New Jersey Assemblyman Herb Conway Jr. introduced a bill similar to the California Age-Appropriate Design Code (“CA AADC”) enacted in September.  The bill, NJ A4919, tracks the CA AADC in many respects but contains several notable differences, which we summarize below:

  • Covered businesses.  The CA AADC applies to any online service,

On Wednesday, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) hosted a virtual event on “Protecting Kids from Stealth Advertising in Digital Media.”  The event featured industry professionals, legal and child development experts, researchers, and consumer advocates to discuss the regulation of digital advertising to children.  Panelists examined the online advertising techniques children are exposed to, children’s capacity to understand and recognize advertising, and the potential harms associated with advertising in an ever-evolving digital landscape.   Continue Reading FTC Hosts Event Regarding Children’s Experiences with Digital Advertising