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Daniel Cooper is co-chair of Covington’s Data Privacy and Cyber Security Practice, and advises clients on information technology regulatory and policy issues, particularly data protection, consumer protection, AI, and data security matters. He has over 20 years of experience in the field, representing clients in regulatory proceedings before privacy authorities in Europe and counseling them on their global compliance and government affairs strategies. Dan regularly lectures on the topic, and was instrumental in drafting the privacy standards applied in professional sport.

According to Chambers UK, his "level of expertise is second to none, but it's also equally paired with a keen understanding of our business and direction." It was noted that "he is very good at calibrating and helping to gauge risk."

Dan is qualified to practice law in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Belgium. He has also been appointed to the advisory and expert boards of privacy NGOs and agencies, such as Privacy International and the European security agency, ENISA.

On November 22, 2022, the Grand Chamber of the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) issued its judgment in joint cases C‑37/20 and C‑601/20, holding that provisions of an EU anti-money laundering directive relating to the publication of beneficial ownership registers was incompatible with the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights (“CFR”). The Court found that while deterring money laundering was a valid objective, making data available to the general public was neither a necessary nor proportionate way to achieve this objective, so contravened the CFR. The judgment demonstrates the Court’s view that sharing a person’s personal data with a third party is a serious intrusion, and that the Court will carefully scrutinize any such sharing.

Although the case concerned the CFR, it sheds light on how the Court approaches similar principles that apply in other contexts, including in the context of the GDPR.

Continue Reading CJEU Invalidates Public Anti-Money Laundering Registers on Privacy Grounds

On October 12, 2022, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) opened a public consultation seeking feedback on the draft guidance document on employment practices, specifically relating to monitoring at work (the “Monitoring at Work Guidance”). The guidance aims to provide practical guidance and good practices relating to monitoring workers in accordance with data protection legislation.

Continue Reading UK Information Commissioner’s Office released a New Draft Employment Guidance for Monitoring at Work

On October 13, 2022, the European Data Protection Supervisor (“EDPS”) released its Opinion 20/2022 on a Recommendation issued by the European Commission in August 2022 calling for a Council Decision authorising the opening of negotiations on behalf of the European Union for a Council of Europe convention on artificial intelligence, human rights, democracy and the

On October 6, 2022, the Advocate General (“AG”) of the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) released an opinion in case C-300/21 to the effect that a controller or processor’s non-compliance with the GDPR does not automatically entitle data subjects to receive compensation for non-material damages pursuant to Article 82 GDPR.  According to the AG, compensation is meant to remedy the consequences caused by a breach of the GDPR, and therefore a data subject must have suffered damage that he or she can affirmatively demonstrate.

Continue Reading CJEU Advocate General Issues Opinion on Non-Material Damages for GDPR Breach

On October 18 and 21, 2022, the European Data Protection Board (“EDPB“) published updated guidelines (i) on personal data breach notification under the GDPR and (ii) on identifying a controller or processor’s lead supervisory authority, respectively. Both guidelines are in draft form and are open to public consultation until the end of November.

Continue Reading EDPB Publishes Updated Guidelines on Personal Data Breach Notification and Identifying the Lead Supervisory Authority

The upcoming date of December 27, 2022, marks the end of the roughly one year and a half-long transition period that companies had to replace any the old versions of the standard contractual clauses for international transfers of personal data by the new standard contractual clauses, which the European Commission adopted on June 4, 2021.  As of December 27, 2022, EU Supervisory Authorities may start GDPR enforcement proceedings against any companies that still on to the old version of the standard contractual clauses.

Covington is well placed to assisting clients in amending their contracts to take into account the new standard contractual clauses and, more generally, to ensure compliance with the GDPR rules on international data transfers.

Continue Reading Countdown for Implementing the New EU Data Transfer Contracts and Overview of other EU Transfer Developments

On October 7, 2022, President Biden signed an Executive Order directing the steps that the United States will take to implement its commitments under the new EU-U.S. Data Privacy Framework.  The framework was announced by the U.S. and the EU Commission in March 2022, after reaching a political agreement in principle (see our blog post

On September 28, 2022, the European Commission published its long-promised proposal for an AI Liability Directive.  The draft Directive is intended to complement the EU AI Act, which the EU’s institutions are still negotiating.  In parallel, the European Commission also published its proposal to update the EU’s 1985 Product Liability Directive.  If adopted, the proposals will change the liability rules for software and AI systems in the EU.

The draft AI Liability Directive establishes rules applicable to non-contractual, fault-based civil claims involving AI systems.  Specifically, the proposal establishes rules that would govern the preservation and disclosure of evidence in cases involving high-risk AI, as well as rules on the burden of proof and corresponding rebuttable presumptions.  If adopted as proposed, the draft AI Liability Directive will apply to damages that occur two years or more after the Directive enters into force; five years after its entry into force, the Commission will consider the need for rules on no-fault liability for AI claims.

As for the draft Directive on Liability of Defective Products, if adopted, EU Member States will have one year from its entry into force to implement it in their national laws.  The draft Directive would apply to products placed on the market one year after it enters into force.

Continue Reading European Commission Publishes Directive on the Liability of Artificial Intelligence Systems

On October 4, 2022, the EU adopted the Digital Services Act (“DSA”), which imposes new rules on providers of intermediary services (e.g., cloud services, file-sharing services, search engines, social networks and online marketplaces).  The DSA will enter into force on November 16, 2022 — although it will only fully apply as of February 17, 2024. 

Continue Reading EU Adopts Digital Services Act