The Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act (“VCDPA”) Work Group has issued its 2021 Final Report. The final report, which is based on the six Work Group meetings between June and October 2021, summarizes information presented at the meetings on topics such as enforcement, definitions and rulemaking authority, as well as consumer rights and education.  We summarize some of the comments below.

Enforcement:

  • The OAG requested the authority to pursue actual damages, should they exist.
  • The OAG recommended that an “ability to cure” option be available for violations where a cure is possible; whereas, consumer groups advocated for a sunset of the “right to cure” provision.

Definitions and Rulemaking:

  • Commenters raised concerns with the definitions of “sale,” “personal data,” “publicly available information,” and “sensitive personal information” in the VCDPA.
  • The report noted that the VA legislature could consider directing an agency to promulgate regulations, in light of the OAG’s comment that the VCDPA currently does not allow the OAG to promulgate regulations. Such a rulemaking process could cover, for example, the definitions of “sale,” “personal data,” “publicly available information,” and “sensitive data.”

Consumer Rights:

  • One commenter requested that the Work Group consider requiring “companies to honor a global opt-out setting as a single-step for consumers to opt out of data collection.” (Notably, however, the VCDPA does not provide any opt out for data collection.)
  • Another commenter suggested that the Work Group amend the “right to delete” provision to be a “right to opt out of sale.”

Delegate Hayes and Senator Marsden are expected to present the official recommendations of the Work Group during the upcoming session of the General Assembly. The Virginia state legislature is scheduled to reconvene on January 12, 2022.

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Photo of Lindsey Tonsager Lindsey Tonsager

Lindsey Tonsager helps national and multinational clients in a broad range of industries anticipate and effectively evaluate legal and reputational risks under federal and state data privacy and communications laws.

In addition to assisting clients engage strategically with the Federal Trade Commission, the…

Lindsey Tonsager helps national and multinational clients in a broad range of industries anticipate and effectively evaluate legal and reputational risks under federal and state data privacy and communications laws.

In addition to assisting clients engage strategically with the Federal Trade Commission, the U.S. Congress, and other federal and state regulators on a proactive basis, she has experience helping clients respond to informal investigations and enforcement actions, including by self-regulatory bodies such as the Digital Advertising Alliance and Children’s Advertising Review Unit.

Ms. Tonsager’s practice focuses on helping clients launch new products and services that implicate the laws governing the use of endorsements and testimonials in advertising and social media, the collection of personal information from children and students online, behavioral advertising, e-mail marketing, artificial intelligence the processing of “big data” in the Internet of Things, spectrum policy, online accessibility, compulsory copyright licensing, telecommunications and new technologies.

Ms. Tonsager also conducts privacy and data security diligence in complex corporate transactions and negotiates agreements with third-party service providers to ensure that robust protections are in place to avoid unauthorized access, use, or disclosure of customer data and other types of confidential information. She regularly assists clients in developing clear privacy disclosures and policies―including website and mobile app disclosures, terms of use, and internal social media and privacy-by-design programs.

Photo of Libbie Canter Libbie Canter

Libbie Canter represents a wide variety of multinational companies on privacy, cyber security, and technology transaction issues, including helping clients with their most complex privacy challenges and the development of governance frameworks and processes to comply with global privacy laws. She routinely supports…

Libbie Canter represents a wide variety of multinational companies on privacy, cyber security, and technology transaction issues, including helping clients with their most complex privacy challenges and the development of governance frameworks and processes to comply with global privacy laws. She routinely supports clients on their efforts to launch new products and services involving emerging technologies, and she has assisted dozens of clients with their efforts to prepare for and comply with federal and state privacy laws, including the California Consumer Privacy Act and California Privacy Rights Act.

Libbie represents clients across industries, but she also has deep expertise in advising clients in highly-regulated sectors, including financial services and digital health companies. She counsels these companies — and their technology and advertising partners — on how to address legacy regulatory issues and the cutting edge issues that have emerged with industry innovations and data collaborations.

Photo of Jayne Ponder Jayne Ponder

Jayne Ponder is an associate in the firm’s Washington, DC office and a member of the Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice Group. Jayne’s practice focuses on a broad range of privacy, data security, and technology issues. She provides ongoing privacy and data protection…

Jayne Ponder is an associate in the firm’s Washington, DC office and a member of the Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice Group. Jayne’s practice focuses on a broad range of privacy, data security, and technology issues. She provides ongoing privacy and data protection counsel to companies, including on topics related to privacy policies and data practices, the California Consumer Privacy Act, and cyber and data security incident response and preparedness.