On July 5, 2021, the Italian Supervisory Authority (“Garante”) announced that it has fined Foodinho S.r.l. (“Foodinho”) 2.6 million EUR for its use of performance algorithms in connection with its employees. The authority held Foodinho in breach of the principles of transparency, security, privacy by default and by design, and held it responsible for not implementing suitable measures to safeguard its employees’ (i.e., riders’) rights and freedoms against discriminatory automated decision making. The Garante’s decision is the first of its kind in the realm of the algorithmic management of gig workers. According to the Garante, Foodinho’s management violated Article 22(3) of the GDPR.
Continue Reading Italian Supervisory Authority Fines Foodinho Over Its Use of Performance Management Algorithms

On May 6, 2020, the Italian Supervisory Authority (“Garante”) published a list of frequently asked questions (“FAQs”) and answers on data protection and COVID-19 (see here, in English).

The FAQs build on and expand guidance previously issued by the Garante (see our blog post here), and take into account recent measures adopted by Italian authorities, such as the Protocol on Fighting COVID-19 in the Workplace that the Italian government signed with several trade unions on March 14, 2020 (see our blog post here), which was slightly amended on April 24, 2020 (see here).

Among other topics, the FAQs cover: (1) data processing by private employers in the context of the COVID-19 health emergency; and (2) data processing in clinical trials and medical research in the context of the COVID-19 health emergency.
Continue Reading Italian Supervisory Authority Publishes FAQs on Data Protection and COVID-19

On March 14, 2020, the Italian Government and several trade unions have signed a protocol, which establishes specific procedures for fighting COVID-19 in the workplace.

The protocol also includes provisions on the processing of personal data of employees.  In particular, it provides that employers may subject their employees to pro-active body temperature controls before

On March 6, 2020, the Italian Data Protection Authority (“Garante”) reported on new measures designed to protect the health data of patients in the context of Government procurement efforts (calls for tender) to acquire medical equipment and devices. The new measures are the result of a collaboration between the Garante and Consip, a company wholly

On March 2, 2020, the Italian Supervisory Authority (“Garante”) published a “statement” in which it clarifies how companies should process personal data in the context of their efforts for preventing a spread of the coronavirus disease (“COVID-19”) among their employees and others in Italy (see here, in Italian).

The Garante made clear that companies

On September 12, 2019, the Italian Supervisory Authority (“Garante”) approved a code of conduct for consumer credit agencies (the “Code”), pursuant to Art. 40 GDPR (see here in Italian).

The Code already existed prior to the GDPR, but it had to be amended to meet the requirements of the GDPR and be approved by the

On July 22, 2019, the Italian supervisory authority for data protection (“Garante”) issued a judgment involving the so-called “right to be forgotten”.  The Garante’s decision explores the boundaries of this right in a case in which Internet users could access an article by using a professional position as a search term, whereas it was not possible to access the article merely by using an individual’s name as a search term.

More specifically, the case before the Garante involved a professional, namely the president of a cooperative, who requested that Google remove a link to online content about him accessible by Internet users.  The content was accessible not by entering the individual’s name as a search term, but rather by entering his position as president of the cooperative, an association that serves the interests of members, i.e., social or economic needs or other general aims.


Continue Reading Italian Supervisory Authority Issues Judgment Concerning ‘Right to be Forgotten’

Earlier this year, in the run-up to the General Data Protection Regulation’s (“GDPR”) May 25, 2018 date of application, a major question for stakeholders was how zealously the GDPR would be enforced.  Now, as the GDPR approaches its six-month birthday, an answer to that question is rapidly emerging.  Enforcement appears to be ramping up significantly. 

On September 5, 2018, a first instance Administrative Court in Italy decided that a public company cannot reject an application for the position of data protection officer (“DPO”) on the basis that the applicant is not a certified ISO 27001 Auditor / Lead Auditor (decision available here).

ISO 27001 is an international information security

By Luca Tosoni and Dan Cooper

On 2 February 2017, the Italian DPA (“Garante”) imposed a record fine of 5,880,000 Euros on a UK company operating in Italy for its violation of the data privacy consent rules contained in Italian law.  This is the largest data privacy fine ever issued by a European data protection authority for a breach of the EU’s data protection framework.

The Garante imposed the fine on a company that allegedly made money transfers to China on behalf of individuals without their knowledge or agreement, and therefore did not obtain the individuals’ consent to the processing of their data.

The size of the fine reflects, in part, the fact that a significant number of data subjects were impacted by the breach.  In fact, the Garante concluded that the company had committed a separate privacy violation for each data subject whose data was used without consent.  The fine therefore reflects the sum total obtained from adding up the fine for each individual breach committed by the company.
Continue Reading Italian DPA Issues Record Data Privacy Fine