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Teresa Lewi represents and counsels employers on a wide range of federal, state, and local employment laws. She focuses her practice on trade secrets, non-competition, executive compensation, separation, employee mobility, discrimination, and wage-and-hour issues.
Teresa has successfully tried cases in federal and state courts, and she also conducts internal investigations concerning trade secrets and workplace issues.

Teresa regularly represents clients in the life sciences, technology, financial services, sports, and entertainment industries. She has resolved matters through the pretrial, trial, and appeals process, as well as through alternative dispute resolution methods. In particular, Teresa has helped companies achieve highly favorable outcomes in high-stakes disputes over the protection of trade secrets or enforcement of agreements with employees.

Teresa’s practice also includes conducting workplace audits, drafting employment agreements and workplace policies, and advising companies on employment law developments (including recent changes to non-competition laws and COVID-19-related regulations).

Many employers and employment agencies have turned to artificial intelligence (“AI”) tools to assist them in making better and faster employment decisions, including in the hiring and promotion processes.  The use of AI for these purposes has been scrutinized and will now be regulated in New York City.  The New York City Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (“DCWP”) recently issued a Notice of Public Hearing and Opportunity to Comment on Proposed Rules relating to the implementation of New York City’s law regulating the use of automated employment decision tools (“AEDT”) by NYC employers and employment agencies.  As detailed further below, the comment period is open until October 24, 2022.

Continue Reading Artificial Intelligence & NYC Employers:  New York City Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Rules That Would Regulate the Use of AI Tools in the Employment Context

On November 8, 2021, New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed a new electronic monitoring law (S2628) requiring New York businesses that monitor or intercept employees’ e-mails, telephone calls, or internet usage to notify employees in writing of these practices.  The new law amends the state’s civil rights law and takes effect on May 7, 2022.
Continue Reading New York Requires Businesses To Notify Employees of Electronic Monitoring