Tag Archives: Surveillance

Future of Privacy Forum: Privacy Papers for Policymakers 2018

On the heels of the Federal Trade Commission’s (“FTC”) third annual “PrivacyCon,” the Future of Privacy Forum hosted its eighth annual “Privacy Papers for Policymakers” event on Capitol Hill—a gathering in which academics present their original scholarly works on privacy-related topics to D.C. policy wonks who may have a hand in shaping laws and regulations … Continue Reading

European Parliament Approves EU-U.S. Umbrella Agreement

Yesterday, the European Parliament voted to approve the EU-U.S. Umbrella Agreement, a framework for the exchange of personal data for law-enforcement (including anti-terrorism) purposes between the EU and U.S.  As we previously explained, negotiations on this Agreement have been underway for quite some time, with the European Parliament first calling for it back in March … Continue Reading

Advocacy Group Letter Opposes Privacy Shield

Yesterday, a group of twenty-seven privacy and civil liberties organizations sent a letter to EU officials opposing the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, which was released last month and is currently being reviewed by the Article 29 Working Party in the EU.  According to the letter, the Privacy Shield “manifestly fails” to meet the standards set by … Continue Reading

Report Questions Use of “Going Dark” to Describe Encryption Trends

A report released yesterday by the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University addresses the recent debate over the use of encryption in communications technologies and its impact on government access to communication data.  The report focuses on the U.S. government’s use of the “going dark” metaphor to describe recent decisions by several … Continue Reading

ICO Releases Concrete Guidance on Privacy Requirements When Recording Video with Drones

On October 15, 2014, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) published an updated code of practice for surveillance cameras.  Among other topics, the ICO uses the Code to begin to address privacy practices for drones.  Drones are not new, but two factors are now making questions about drones and privacy practices more pressing.  First, many … Continue Reading

New Version of USA Freedom Act Introduced

By David Fagan, Richard Hertling, and Kate Goodloe Senate Judiciary Chairman Patrick J. Leahy introduced a new version of the Uniting and Strengthening America by Fulfilling Rights and Ensuring Effective Discipline Over Monitoring Act of 2014 (the “USA FREEDOM Act” or “Act”) in the Senate on Tuesday, more than two months House of Representatives passed … Continue Reading

A Public Advocate for Privacy

Since 1979, the United States Government has made at least 35,651 applications to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) for authority to conduct electronic surveillance and physical searches of individuals.[1]  Of those requests, only 12 have been denied; 532 requests have been formally modified.  According to one judge on the FISC, a substantially higher number … Continue Reading

Task Force: Phone Companies Should Keep Bulk Metadata Records for NSA

Billions of bulk phone call records used for government surveillance programs should be stored with telecommunications providers rather than with the NSA, according to reports of a proposal from a presidential task forced examining reforms to surveillance authorities.  Recommendations from the Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technology were presented to the President on Friday,  … Continue Reading

European Parliament Calls for Suspension of the SWIFT Agreement following NSA Surveillance Claims

On October 23, 2013, the European Parliament adopted a resolution calling for the suspension of an EU-US Agreement on the transfer of financial data for the purposes of the Terrorist Finance Tracking Program (the so-called “SWIFT Agreement”).  The resolution comes after allegations that the US National Security Agency (NSA) has had unauthorized access to EU citizens’ bank … Continue Reading

Boston Marathon Bombings Spark Renewed Debate Over Surveillance

In the wake of the Boston marathon bombings and in response to the quick work of law enforcement officials who were significantly aided in their identification of the suspected bombers by videos from government- and privately owned surveillance cameras, there has been renewed public discussion regarding the privacy implications of the proliferation of security cameras. … Continue Reading
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