On September 22, 2020, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) hosted “Data to Go,” a virtual workshop on data portability. The workshop convened experts from civil society, academia, and industry to discuss the potential risks as well as consumer and competition benefits of data portability, as well as issues and best practices related to its implementation in legislative and industry-led initiatives. The discussions emphasized five key themes regarding data portability efforts in the U.S. and globally.
Continue Reading Five Key Themes from the FTC’s Data Portability Workshop

Senators Jeff Merkley (D-Merkley) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) recently introduced the National Biometric Information Privacy Act (NBIPA), which would require private entities to obtain consumers’ and employees’ written consent prior to collecting their biometric information and expand nationwide individuals’ access rights and rights to request additional information from businesses.  The bill also would grant a private right of action.  Unlike other proposals that focus on regulating the use and funding of biometric surveillance technology by government entities, the NBIPA regulates private entities’ use of biometrics.
Continue Reading Bill Restricting Companies’ Use of Biometrics and Expanding California’s Right To Know Nationwide Introduced in Senate

On June 24, 2020, the European Commission (“Commission”) published its much-anticipated assessment of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) two years after it went into effect.  The assessment takes into account contributions from the European Council, the European Parliament, the European Data Protection Board (“EDPB”), individual supervisory authorities, the Multi-Stakeholder Expert Group and other stakeholders.  The assessment considers a wider scope of issues surrounding GDPR implementation beyond international transfers and the cooperation and consistency mechanisms, the two topics the Commission is specifically tasked to consider under Article 97 of the GDPR.

The Commission’s overall conclusion is that the GDPR has successfully achieved its objectives of enhancing the protection of personal data and improving the free flow of personal data within the EU.  The Commission specifically highlights the key role that the GDPR plays in the EU’s “human-centric approach to technology,” and notes that it will serve as a guiding legal framework for the EU as it rolls out its broader Data Strategy.  The Commission also notes the impact that the GDPR has had worldwide, inspiring new or elevated standards for data protection in many countries, and serving as a “global standard-setter” for regulating the digital economy.

Notwithstanding these achievements, the Commission also makes clear that there are a number of areas for improvement.


Continue Reading European Commission Publishes 2-Year Report on the Implementation of the GDPR

On January 27, 2020, the French Supervisory Authority (“CNIL”) issued a guidance for developers of websites and applications which sets out the main principles of the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), expounds on their application in the online environment, and gives practical tips to help developers respect users’ privacy when deploying websites and apps.

The guidance consists of 17 recommendations, each covering a key principle supported by additional advice and examples.  Below, we list all 17 of these recommendations and provide a brief summary of the CNIL’s advice related to each.


Continue Reading French Supervisory Authority Publishes Guidance for Website and App Developers

On July 24, 2019, the European Commission (“the Commission”) published a report appraising Europe’s progress in implementing the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) as a central component of its revamped data protection framework.  In its report, the Commission highlights certain achievements resulting from implementation efforts, calls attention to issues that require further action, and describes several ongoing and planned initiatives.  The report is a follow-up to a prior report issued in January 2018, and was informed to a great extent by the ongoing work of the Multi-stakeholder Group, which is comprised of civil society and business representatives, academics and practitioners, to support the application of the GDPR.  The report will contribute to the Commission’s formal 2-year review of the GDPR to take place in May 2020.

Continue Reading European Commission Issues Report on the Implementation of the GDPR

On May 31, 2019, the Cyberspace Administration of China (“CAC”) released the draft Regulation on the Protection of Children’s Personal Information Online (“Draft Regulation”) for public comment. (An official Chinese version is available here and an unofficial English translation of the Draft Regulation is available here.) The comment period ends on June 30, 2019.

As mentioned in our last blog post (available here), CAC issued the draft Measures for Data Security Management (“Draft Measures”) just last week, which set out the general regulatory framework that will govern the collection and use of personal information by network operators (broadly defined as “owners and managers of networks, as well as network service providers”). The release of this new Draft Regulation demonstrates CAC’s intention to set out more stringent requirements for network operators if they collect, store, use, transfer or disclose the personal information of minors under 14 years old. We discuss the key requirements of the Draft Regulation in a greater detail below.


Continue Reading CAC Releases Draft Regulation on the Protection of Children’s Personal Information Online

On March 28, 2019, the Council of Europe* issued a new Recommendation on the protection of health-related data.  The Recommendation calls on all Council of Europe member states to take steps to ensure that the principles for processing health-related data (in both the public and private sector) set out in the Appendix of the Recommendation

On 25 May 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect. The GDPR establishes some of the most robust privacy requirements globally and is likely to be a model followed by other jurisdictions. Airlines are uniquely affected by the GDPR with passenger data being at the heart of their business and international operations. As new technologies allow airlines to pursue new and innovative uses of customer data, it is imperative that airlines continue to conduct their operations with GDPR compliance in mind, particularly given the financial and other reputational issues that can arise for a failure to meet the GDPR’s strict requirements.

Below are 5 key issues for airlines to consider in relation to the GDPR post-implementation.
Continue Reading GDPR: Top 5 Post-Implementation Issues for Airlines