Big Data

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.  This article focusses on the obligations of data holders; for an overview of the EHDS generally, see our first post in this series.

We expect the final text of the EHDS to be adopted by the European Parliament in April 2024 and by the EU Member States shortly thereafter.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 2: The European Health Data Space from the Health Data Holder’s Perspective

On November 27, 2023, the Council of the EU formally adopted the Data Act, following the European Parliament’s endorsement of November 9, which concludes the EU legislative process.  As noted below, the Data Act will shortly be published in the Official Journal and become enforceable in 2025.

The Data Act is designed to require entities to make data, including non-personal data, accessible to other parties, so that it can be re-used for new purposes.  The Data Act’s obligations are broad  and may require significant engineering work to re-design products to ensure compliance.  

We provide below a brief overview of key takeaways and timelines.Continue Reading Data Act Becomes Law: What Next?

This quarterly update summarizes key legislative and regulatory developments in the fourth quarter of 2022 related to Artificial Intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), connected and autonomous vehicles (“CAVs”), and data privacy and cybersecurity.Continue Reading U.S. AI, IoT, CAV, and Privacy Legislative Update – Fourth Quarter 2022

In October 2019, the UK and U.S. Governments signed an agreement on cross-border law enforcement demands for data from Communication Service Providers (the “Agreement”, which we described in our earlier post here). Only now, however, have the two countries completed the procedural steps required to bring the Agreement into force. On July 21, 2022

In January 2022, China released two regulations (one in draft form) that touch on hot topics in technological development – algorithmic recommendations and deep synthesis – making it one of the first countries in the world to directly tackle these cutting edge areas.  In this post, we provide an overview of the draft Provisions on

On 8 April 2020, the European Commission adopted a recommendation on a common European Union toolbox for the use of technology and data to address the COVID-19 crisis (“Recommendation”).  The Recommendation responds to calls for a common EU approach to the use of mobile apps in combatting COVID-19—one that improves the efficacy of the technology while respecting citizens’ privacy rights.

The Recommendation has since been complemented by a separate Commission guidance paper on COVID-19 apps (“Guidance”) and release of a Common EU Toolbox for Member States (“Toolbox”) by the EU’s eHealth Network, a Commission-established body comprised of Member State authorities responsible for eHealth matters.   In addition, the European Data Protection Board (“EDPB”), which contributed to the Guidance, has published a letter to the Commission in response to the Guidance (“Letter”).

This blog will discuss the headline points contained within the Recommendation, Guidance, Toolbox, and Letter.  We will publish more detailed analyses of the Toolbox and Guidance in subsequent blogs.Continue Reading EU Commission Releases Guidance on COVID-19 Apps

On February 10, 2020, the UK Government’s Committee on Standards in Public Life* (the “Committee”) published its Report on Artificial Intelligence and Public Standards (the “Report”). The Report examines potential opportunities and hurdles in the deployment of AI in the public sector, including how such deployment may implicate the “Seven Principles of Public Life” applicable to holders of public office, also known as the “Nolan Principles” (available here). It also sets out practical recommendations for use of AI in public services, which will be of interest to companies supplying AI technologies to the public sector (including the UK National Health Service (“NHS”)), or offering public services directly to UK citizens on behalf of the UK Government. The Report elaborates on the UK Government’s June 2019 Guide to using AI in the public sector (see our previous blog here).
Continue Reading UK Government’s Advisory Committee Publishes Report on Public Sector Use of AI